Friday, August 12, 2011

How to Air Kiss

When you feel uncomfortable kissing someone on the cheek, but feel that something more than a hug is required, an air kiss is an appropriate greeting.
When you feel uncomfortable kissing someone on the cheek, but feel that something more than a hug is required, an air kiss is an appropriate greeting.

There are times when you're greeting people with whom you are on good enough terms to call for something more than just a handshake or hug, but it's just not appropriate or comfortable to plant a kiss directly on their cheek. In these cases, giving them an air kiss, where you brush cheeks and kiss the air near their cheek, is a good display of social decorum. Made popular by celebrities, who must often mingle and make nice with people they barely know, it's most common on formal social occasions and among friendly, well-mannered acquaintances.


Edit Steps

  1. 1
    Know when to air kiss. Consider both the occasion and the nature of your relationship with each person you greet. Typically, a formal event (such as weddings, formal parties, and official ceremonies) that brings together people who are on good terms, but who otherwise don't see each other, is the common setting for air kisses. Less formal occasions (family get-togethers, neighborhood barbecue, and casual lunches) may warrant the traditional hug and lips-on-cheek kiss, especially if you see the person you're greeting on a regular basis.

  2. 2
    Observe how other people are greeting each other. This will give you the opportunity to gauge the formality of the occasion and confirm your judgment about whether this is an appropriate time to air kiss. For example, if you're approaching an entrance and the host is at the door greeting people, see how they are behaving. If your cousin, who's in front of you, gets an air kiss, and you're no closer to the host than your cousin is, then you're probably going to be expected to give an air kiss.
  3. 3
    Read their body language.
    Read their body language.
    Read their body language. As you approach, reach out with your hand, whether to touch or grasp their upper arm, elbow, or hand(s). If they recoil or tighten up in any way, it might be wise to consider defaulting to just a loose hug. If they seem relaxed and return your contact, an air kiss is probably in order. And if they embrace you affectionately or touch your face, prepare to kiss and be kissed, traditional style.
  4. 4
    Lean in for an air kiss.
    Lean in for an air kiss.
    Lean in for an air kiss. Aim to bring your lips near their right cheek (unless it's customary in your culture to start with the left). Remain observant, though, that they're going for your right cheek, because if they go for your left cheek and you go for their right (or vice versa) there may be an awkward halt as you both realize your faces are about to crash together. As you're going in for the kiss, it's not uncommon to brush cheeks gently.
  5. 5
    Kiss the air next to their cheek.
    Kiss the air next to their cheek.

No comments:

Post a Comment